Moorings

James 1-3A.W. Tozer, an early 20th century evangelist and writer, said, “What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us.” Thoughts of God come often into my mind, especially when Douglas hits rough seas on his mental health recovery journey. In fact, I have discovered that what I think about God during those times of turbulence not only exposes the very foundations of my faith, but, in many ways, forecasts how I will weather the storm.

Trials have a way of stripping our faith down to its bare bones. We review again what we believe about God: His existence, His goodness, His trustworthiness. We come face to face with what we believe about ourselves: our limitations, our capabilities, our fears. And mental health crises force us to re-examine our thoughts regarding our loved one: grief, compassion, despair.

My thoughts of God in times of desperation go something like this:

Either there is a God, or there isn’t.
Either He is good, or He’s not.
Either I can trust Him, or I can’t.

Yes.
Yes.
Yes.

Either there is a God, or there isn’t.
Either He is good, or He’s not.
Either I can trust Him, or I can’t.

Yes.
Yes.
Yes.

In the stormy times, this little litany has provided a tether to tie my faith to the God I have believed in when the seas of life were calm. It is a secure mooring that holds me fast to the God who loves Douglas and who loves me.

Either there is a God, or there isn’t.
Either He is good, or He’s not.
Either we can trust Him, or we can’t.

There is.
He is.
We can.

——

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